Yokomo Annouces YD2SXIII 5/29/2020

PREORDER YOURS TODAY:

PREORDER: Yokomo YD-2SX III RWD 1/10 PREMIUM RC Drift Car Kit [Yokomo] DP-YD2SXIII

 

 

 

Looks like Yokomo does it again! Finally a shorty battery holder! The new SXIII will come with the new front bulk head as well. This is a great choice for anyone trying to get a top notch car!

A couple of interesting things:

This new SXIII uses what we all know as the EX deck which is usually the lower center gravity version. But now it’s the E deck with the S gear box(top mounted motor).

A lot of us have been doing a S/E Frankenstein build, but little did we know, we were close to making a home brew SX3!

We can’t wait to bring some of these in next month and do some testing. We will try to source the new battery holder for those EX1 and EX2 owners.

Yokomo Official Release Note:

The SX series, which enhances traction with a high mount motor, has been redesigned to double deck specifications! Corresponding to high speed driving with a significant improvement in pitching rigidity, quick handling and sharp turning has evolved even further. The front bulkhead is fully loaded with optional parts, such as a one-piece aluminum body, and this is already a competitive kit that responds quickly to severe steering operations.

High-quality finish with plenty of aluminum parts. A highly rigid integral bulkhead improves stability.The shocks are equipped with an aluminum super low friction shock.
Graphite upper deck with significantly improved pitching rigidity. The steering system is a highly evaluated slide rack specification, which draws out neutral characteristics throughout the range of motion.
The newly designed battery holder is designed for low-height batteries. Two types of battery holders are included, and standard size batteries can also be installed.

The rear side inherits the SX series, and the motor mount also comes with a special type of heat sink shape. The motor is rotated in 7 steps around the spur gear shaft, allowing fine adjustment of the weight balance.

● NEW Aluminum integrated front bulkhead
● NEW graphite main chassis
● Graphite upper deck
● NEWΦ4.8mm Pillow ball specifications (upper arm, tie rod, king pin ball)
● Standard short Li-po compatible battery holder (New shape)


RTR vs. Build Your Own – Which Is For You? (Part 1)

MST (Max Speed Technology) has been offering the RMX 2.0 in a RTR (Ready To Run) package. What does this mean, and is it for you?

Everything to get started in the box

Over the past few years, we have sold many MST RMX 2.0 RTRs, as well as the RMX 2.0s, Yokomo YD2, Overdose Galm, and other kits. Since we also have a track here at Super-G with plenty of traffic, we are in the unique position to be able to observe how certain products are used and what kind of longevity people get from their various components. This knowledge has proven invaluable time and time again. The RMX 2.0 RTR is no exception. As always, I will give it to you straight.

Is the RMX 2.0 RTR the same chassis as the Kit Version RMX 2.0s? The short answer is yes. The more accurate answer is, it can be.

What most people will tell you is, the RMX 2.0 RTR is the cheapest way to get into R/C Drift. It can be upgraded to run with the best of the best, and the electronics aren’t the best, but they will get you going. All this is true, but in my opinion doesn’t tell the entire story. Read on.

MST RMX 2.0 RTR – Ready To Run out of the box. Tested at the factory before shipping

Here is my complete answer on the RMX 2.0 RTR:
The RTR setup is the cheapest way to get into RC Drift for about the first month. As soon as you start upgrading, (which you will most likely start doing within the first month or so) you will start to break even with piecing a kit together (Kit Version with electronics purchased separately). So if you are on a strict budget and want to get started at the price of the RTR, then that really is your only option and there is nothing wrong with that. If you and your buddies are going to bash around in a parking lot or garage, there’s nothing wrong with the RTR. Just be aware piecing a setup together is generally a couple hundred dollars more on the lower end, but will end up costing less in the first couple months on average from what I have seen. You will also have some options, so you can choose where to spend a little extra if you want.

MST RMX 2.0s and RTR can both be setup high or low mounted motor

The Differences:
Although the chassis itself IS the same and MOST of the components are shared between both the RTR and the Kit, they are not outfitted exactly the same.

The first difference you will find, if you want to adjust the toe on your steering, or camber front and/or rear, the RTR has Solid Links. This means you need to buy turnbuckles to adjust anything. The kit comes with turnbuckles stock.

The next difference you will find is the RTR comes with a Spool (Solid Axle) In some cases people prefer running a spool, but for the most part the Ball Diff is more desirable and comes stock on the kit. In addition, when you find you need to change the bevel gears inside the gearbox, the arbor that holds the bevel gear is also different and must be changed at this time as well.

The RTR comes with KPI Knuckles (King Pin Inclination) vs. Standard Knuckles (Straight) on the kit. I’m not sure why, but that’s how they have been coming. Not better or worse, but definitely different. If this is your first Drift Chassis, you’re not going to care at this point.

The RTR and the kit also come with different springs. Again, not better or worse, but they are different.

Once you upgrade these components, the RTR is now at the level of the Box Stock RMX 2.0s kit. You have also taken apart the most complicated part of the RMX chassis, the gearbox, so if you bought the RTR to avoid building the kit, you have basically done it at this point.

The RTR Remote – It controls the car. As basic as it gets.

Electronics – RTR vs. Separate Components:
“These will be good enough, right? I mean, I’m not a pro or anything right now. I can upgrade them later, right?”
  This is the what we hear often. The full answer is, yes, they are good enough to get you going. All the electronics are entry-level and you can use them to learn and have fun, but you will want to upgrade all the electronics eventually. Usually sooner than later from what we have seen.

Servo – The one provided with the RTR is very entry-level. It turns the wheels and is actually useable, but leaves a lot of room for improvement. When upgrading to even a mid-grade servo a lot of improvement in steering and response is noticed. It is also not very rugged, so if you are hitting things often, expect to be changing this out soon.

Gyro – The one provided with the RTR again is very entry-level. It keeps you from spinning and will get you going in the RWD game, but it does leave a lot to be desired. It seems the single most noticeable upgrade is the Gyro, followed closely by the Servo. It’s so close many would say the opposite is true. It tends to have issues losing center sometimes, and often is a bit shaky. Even the available low-end gyros seem to be a decent improvement.

ESC and Motor – Although the ESC and Motor combo that comes with the RTR will get you going, it’s not a sensored setup. It is a pretty low power setup but allows you to get a good feel for what is going on. It’s smooth for an unsensored motor and ESC, but you’re not going to be upgrading one without the other. Again, this is an entry-level setup, so this leaves a lot of room for improvement.
A side note: If you run an upgraded servo, you may find it draws too much current for this ESC, so you will need to run a Glitch Buster on your receiver to eliminate some very erratic behavior.

Radio (Remote) – The one provided with the RTR is specifically made for this purpose. Getting a good name brand remote is essential to making your R/C experience a good one. You don’t need the top of the line, but even the lower end radios from Futaba and Sanwa run circles on the RTR remote. As with everything listed here, the RTR remote will get you up and running, but you are going to want to upgrade pretty quickly.

What is the benefit of separate electronics?
The simple answer is, ALL the RTR electronics that are included are aimed at the beginner with the sole purpose of getting you started at the lowest price possible. Separate electronics will allow you to choose better quality and better performing electronics, rather than purchasing the RTR electronics and then paying again for the replacement.

We have broken down the electronics into 3 different categories in the attempt to simplify what can be confusing to someone just getting into the hobby.

Keep in mind, base kits are as follows:
MST RMX 2.0s – $180 approx.
Yokomo YD2E – $199 approx.
Yokomo YD2S – $199 approx.
Overdose Galm – $349 approx.

The above listed also need electronics added

Minimum Recommended Radio – Futaba 3PV

Minimum Recommended – $360 approx.:
Radio – Entry Level from Futaba/Sanwa
Servo – Mid-Grade Metal gear, High-Speed
Gyro – Basic (No End Point Adjustment)
Motor/ESC – 60amp Sensored w/ Boost and Turbo

This type of setup is sufficient to be competitive and covers all the basic functions. It is upgrade friendly. This means you can upgrade any of your components without any issues from the others.
Upgrading any of these at the time of purchase is recommended, but not necessary. Each component is slightly more with the exception of the radio which is a decent sized difference in cost.

Mid-Range Radio that has all the functionality needed – Futaba 4PM

Ideal Level – $800 approx.:
Radio – Futaba 4PM or equivelent
Servo – Mid to High-Grade KO Propo, Yokomo, Futaba, etc.
Gyro – New Generation with End Point Adjustment
Motor/ESC – 120 amp, Sensored, w/ Boost and Turbo

At this level you have full adjustability and have access to the latest technology. Adjustable curves for steering and throttle (If you use that), and the ability to run hotter motors without maxing out the ESC capabilities.
At this level, many choose to substitute items from the Professional Level List. Some items are shared between the two and these lists are just a guide to be used as examples.

Pro Level – Color Touch Screen, Telemetry, Adjust Select ESCs from Remote – Futaba 7PXR

Professional Level – $1000+ :
Radio – Futaba 7PX / Sanwa M17 (Top of the line models)
Servo – Programable / High-Speed / High-Torque, Futaba CT700, Reve D, Yokomo 003, etc.
Gyro – KO Propo KGX, Yokomo V4 (Fully adjustable)
Motor/ESC – 160-180 amp, Sensored, w/ Boost and Turbo

At the professional level, this the pinnacle of performance. You have full control over just about everything. On the servo you can program speed, torque, holding force, etc. The gyro allows different modes, how much or how little the gyro assists, and endpoints. The ESC is typically smoother with more adjustment. The radio interface and feel is just a lot nicer all around. The high-end radios also allow you to adjust more than just your basics, but the real difference is in the look and feel. Some will argue there is better response as well. Regardless, a High-End Radio just makes the entire experience better.

Final Thoughts:
The bottom line is, the MST RMX RTR is aimed at the beginner or someone looking to get into R/C Drift at the most budget friendly price point at the time of purchase. It is NOT the cheapest after you start upgrading (and you will), and ends up being one of the more expensive routes to being fully upgraded. (Difference of about $200 at the end of the day)

Only you know your situation and what you truly value. If you are the type to be content with what you have for a good amount of time, or you are ok to spend a little more in the long run to be able to test R/C Drift to see if it’s for you, then the RTR can be a good choice.

However, if you are the type to upgrade right away, and know you will eventually be upgrading everything, I would strongly suggest taking a look at the other options. If your goal is to be fully hopped up in the end, there are more economical routes. As stated in the opening, It is the cheapest option for about the first month, then the upgrades start coming. Again, only you know what is best for you.

Last, I feel I must also say many of us change even the best equipment often. So it’s not a buy right, buy once type of hobby. For many, it’s buy and buy again and again.

The best advise I can give is, just be honest with yourself. Who cares what others think. In the end it’s your money. I just hope this clarifies things a bit and can help you make the best decision for yourself.

Feel free to email us at SuperGdrift@gmail.com for more information and help with different options.
More information here:
http://supergdrift.com/store/which-chassis-and-why/




FIRST LOOK: Pandora BN SPORT BLS ZN6 (FRS)

This ultra aggressive look is pretty sick!

The aero really takes the ZN6 chassis to the next level!

The detached bumpers allow for a more 3d realistic look!

Might be a huge milestone! Looks like they’re giving us nice masking paper sheets. The back of the sheet has a QR code that takes you to a PDF!

We ran out sheet through the laserjet printer and was able to make our own masks!

These masks might take an extra step to get working, but the material is much nicer than their older stuff.

Looks like you get the usual BN Sport decal sheet and body decal set.

 

Photo taken with Focos

You can grab yours today:

Super Drift Championship Round 2 (SoCal Region)

March 7, 2020
This past weekend was the Super Drift Championship Round 2 for the SoCal Region here at Super-G R/C Drift Arena. We had a great turnout with 37 competitors, many new faces, and a lot of serious skills.

Super Drift Championship Round 2 SoCal Region

The judges for the event were Shaine Collins (Team D-Style), Manny Campalans (RawFew), and myself, Steve Fujita. Joe Tam was emcee for the night, as well as running our audio/visual and live stream. He really is a one-man entertainment center.

In Round 1 we ended up running really late and qualifying took forever. So for Round 2, we offered to do early qualifying in hopes of speeding up the actual competition. When we announced it, there were no responses, so we just went on as planned. I later found out there were a couple people interested, but hardly enough to warrant breaking up practice for.

The reverse layout proved to be challenging for many, but we always try to switch it up for every comp. This round we went with more inside clips than outer. This seemed to push everyone to dig deep for those skills they normally don’t use heavily.

Qualifying:
This round us judges decided we would not discuss the qualifying runs after each run, but rather write down our scores and add them at the end. This helped to move the qualifying right along and was a better overall way to run it. I was pleased to find when checking the scores, all three judges were within a couple points of each other. Further reinforcing the fact our point system is working and is consistent.

Congratuations to Manny Campalans for taking TQ for the event!!!

Futaba Top Qualifier!
Futaba has generously donated to sponsor the Super Drift Championship here at Super-G and this round the winner of the Futaba Top Qualifier went to Manny Campalans from (Team Futaba USA / RawFew). He had his choice of the new CT700 Servo or the GYD450. He chose the GYD450 Gyro! Congratulations Manny on a awesome qualifying run!

Tsuiso Battles:
I know I say it every time, but when the driving is at this level, it really deserves to be mentioned again. The driving skills demonstrated here in Round 2 were really top notch. Most of the battles were won or lost based on some of the smallest margins we have seen. What this means for the future is, competitors really need to step up their game and pay attention to the finer details now.

Victor Romo vs. Aydin Angulo – 1st and 2nd Place Battles!

In the finals, it was Mikko Yang vs. Albert Martinez for 3rd and 4th position, and Aydin Angulo vs. Victor Romo for 1st and 2nd.
First up was Mikko vs. Albert. Mikko had a great lead run and Albert had a great chase. They switched positions and this time Albert was leading, Mikko chasing. On the first clip Albert had gone wide and hooked his wing on the fence and an extension cord that was behind that. This gave Mikko an easy win, and the 3rd spot on the podium. Then it was time for the big dogs, Aydin vs. Victor for 1st and 2nd. On the first run, both Aydin and Victor made contact and forced a OMT (One More Time). On the second run, it came down to the first clip and who did it better. This time around it was Aydin who put it down for the win and the top spot on the podium! Victor took home a very respectable 2nd place!

Congratulations to the winners! 1st – Aydin Angulo, 2nd – Victor Romo, and 3rd – Mikko Yang!

Congratulations to First Place – Aydin Angulo (Team Zenshin), Second Place – Victor Romo (Sell Out Boys), and Third Place – Mikko Yang (Team Reve D-Style)

SoCal Region Official Point Standings

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